2015 Islands Luthiers Guild Guitar Show

ILGSHOW Plans are already afoot for the 2015 show, which will be held on October 17 at the Errington War Memorial Hall – same place as last year. The show, the entry to which is free, will start at 10:00 am and go to 3:00 pm.  Luthiers showing their instruments will pay a $20 table fee.  Shortly after the show ends (at 4:00 pm), there will be a workshop with Michael Dunn, a well-known luthier and musician from Vancouver.  Following that, at 8:00 pm, there will be an evening concert with The Paper Boys, a wonderful folk band also from Vancouver.  Stay tuned for more details.  This is an event not to be missed!

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I’ve got a bluegrass banjo under construction too.

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I’m building a maple Masteretone-style bluegrass banjo with all the Mastertone-style hardware from Stewart MacDonald:  Flathead tone ring, coordinator rods, Kerschner tailpiece, 5-Star tuners, except for two real Keith tuners for those who love to do the D-tuning thing.  The resonator is curly maple, and the neck is birds eye figured hard maple.  This is one big instrument – lots of metal parts!  I’m hoping I’ll have time to finish it before summer.  It will go on sale then for $2000.

Here’s a frailing banjo for sale!

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This is a maple banjo with a Whyte Laydie tone ring for that wonderful old-time sound. This is a substantial instrument – quite an armful since it is made of maple, and has lots of hardware. That tone ring has some substance! It has an armrest, 5-Star planetary tuners, a No-knot tailpiece, some inlay (see the details in the slide show) and co-ordinator rods in the rim to aid in keeping its shape and adjusting the neck. It’s one loud banjo:  Assert yourself! Its brand new and for sale for $1600 with a hardshell case. Contact me at my email address for details.

The beginnings of an Australian blackwood parlor guitar

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The back of the blackwood guitar

Austalian blackwood (Acacia melanoxylon) is almost identical to Hawaiian koa (Acacia koa). This stuff comes from a fellow luthier, Tim O’Dea, who lives in Corindi Beach, New South Wales (Australia). I traded some red cedar tops for several blackwood back and side sets. It was a good deal for each of us: The local scarcity of cedar in OZ and blackwood in BC rendered each valuable….. to the other guy. The top on this instrument is some sweet Lutz spruce from Shane Neifer in Terrace, BC.

More construction details – readying the peghead for tuners

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Making the peghead is fun: It’s an opportunity not only to make a peghead that functions well, but also is decorated. Here’s the procedures for cutting the tuning post slots and the tuner roller holes. Later I’ll show examples of how to do the inlay.